Minikin #AtoZChallenge

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Minikin – small.

I was gardening and humming along to the radio when I saw a flash of orange. Frowning and wondering what it was, I peered closely under a small bush and saw a tiny kitten.

Crying out, I dropped my trowel and carefully picked up the limb body. Was it dead?

Hurrying into the house, I wrapped the kitten in a tea towel and took my gardening gloves off. I rubbed the towel over the kitten, not wanting the poor think to be dead.

There was a weak mew and small wiggle of movement. I peeked into the wrapped towel and saw a little white paw moving.

Straight a way, I thought of one of my neighbours who fostered abandoned kittens. She would know what to do.

I took the tiny kitten to her and got her to help. It was touch and go because the kitten was only a week or so old and was so weak.

Everyday, I went to see the kitten, prepared for the bad news but the kitten hung on and got well and strong.

I named her Mini and as soon as she was well enough, I brought her home to live with me.

(Inspired by; http://www.a-to-zchallenge.com)

Untrodden #WritePhoto

The snow lay thick across everything. Hilda stepped outside her house, admiring the view and taking a photo with her phone. This early in the morning, nothing but birds had touched the snow and it looked as pure as it been in the clouds.

Hilda felt like laughing, she wasn’t sure why, maybe due to the overwhelming joy in her chest? She loved winter, there was just something so magical and special about the season compared to all the others. Maybe, it was also because her family came from Russia, the home of winter.

It was too cold to laugh, her breath was misting badly in front of her because she had been stood too long. Instead, she smiled and carried on walking down the country lane. There was no wind but some loose snow was drifting from tree branches. Hilda wished it would snow again, there was nothing like the feeling of snowflakes on warm skin.

Following the path around, she came to a breathtaking sight. Snow covered hills rose in the distance, the tops of which were covered by fog. Naked trees spiked the fields, frost bitten and snow draped. A wobbly wood and wire fence ran to the left of her, frozen snow domed the posts.

She scooped a handful of snow up in her gloved hands, patted it down and threw it at a near by tree. It fell short with a soft plop. Hilda laughed, feeling such like a child again that she could no longer contain herself. As her voice faded, she heard something, a faint cry?

Holding her breath, she listened and heard what sounded like a baby crying. The spell of magical winter gone, Hilda grew concerned and tried to follow the sound. It seemed to be coming from the tree she had thrown the snowball at.

How was it possible that a baby was out here alone? she wondered.

Hilda searched around the tree trunk, the crying had grown louder. She moved some snow away and found a little hollow. What was that inside? She reached in, thinking it just more snow but instead her hands withdrew something else. Holding it up to her face, Hilda saw the tiniest kitten she had every seen. It was snow white, with blue eyes and a touch of a pink mouth.

‘Oh! You poor thing!’ Hilda cried, ‘What are you doing out here?’

The kitten give a small whimper.

Quickly unzipping her coat, Hilda tugged the kitten inside to keep it warm. Zipping up again, she inspected the trunk and roots of the tree carefully but she found nothing else. Still worried that there might be more kittens or a mother cat out here, Hilda wandered from tree to tree, bush to bush, anywhere an animal could hide from freezing.

Sometime later and far down the lane, Hilda had to give up which really wasn’t what she wanted to do. There had been no other signs of cats though and Hilda’s worry had moved on to the kitten in her coat. She could feel it’s warm and gentle breathing against her chest.

Heading back home, Hilda decided she would have to find out how to take care of the kitten. She had never had a pet before. Maybe, someone had just lost the little thing and she could find the owner in the village or at one of the farms?

As soon as I know the kitten is okay, I’ll do that, Hilda decided.

Days later and after a lot of asking around, no one had come to claim the kitten. Hilda had decided to name her Snowy and she was doing great. Her time outside had’t seemed to have effected her that much. Snowy was growing stronger all the time and Hilda had fallen in love with her.

 

(Inspired by; https://scvincent.com/2018/11/29/thursday-photo-prompt-untrodden-writephoto/ with thanks).

Postcard #48

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Dear Jen,

I’m so sorry for your loss. How you holding up? I would have been in contact sooner but things have been hard here too. All children have been sick – stomach bug, Mabel and I have been run off our feet then we got ill too.

The only good thing is the birth of the kittens went well. They all are fluffy white and blue eyed! Winners for sure! I’ll send you photos and you must let us know if you want one. You might now be in need of the company.

All our thoughts are with you, Al.

Kitty

It was cold and there was no warm place to go. The tiny black kitten stopped into a shop doorway and stood shivering. He didn’t understand what the icy, wet stuff falling around was. He only knew that it made everything white and made him feel worse. He meowed as loud as he could and listened, hoping that he would hear the reply of his mum. There was nothing but the sounds of city.

Over the last few days he had grown use to the sounds and begun to recognize them. The giants had loud voices, heavy footsteps and often had swinging plastic things attached to them. Some smelt good and others bad. He was afraid of them as he didn’t understand them. Maybe that was because the first time he had seen one of them, it had chased him and he had only escaped by crawling under the roaring, spewing, metal boxes. He had seen how the giants got in and made them move and then they got out of them. He avoided them at all coast, but sometimes they made warm sleeping places.

Some of the other sounds were made by a thing his mum had called wind. It was an invisible force that sneaked up behind you and tugged your fur. It made you feel cold and threw things in your face. It could also be very quiet and then very loud. The howling noises always scared him. He didn’t like this wind. There was that other thing, she mum had called rain. That was wet and cold, but not like the stuff falling now. The rain made noises too and the giants would huddle under things and move quickly. It made him move fast too.

He huddled in the corner, meowing and watching the stuff landing. Though it was very dark he wasn’t afraid, he only feared being alone. He dropped down, trying to keep warm in a ball and thought about what had happened. He could barely recall it now. There had been this inside, he thought it was called. It was dry and warm and the wet and cold couldn’t get you. There he was in a bed with his brothers and sisters all around him. His mum would come and go and she would smell of different things each time. There was a giant there only it was a quiet one and it didn’t move much and wasn’t loud. He remembered the flashing box in the corner and how it lit up in the dark. He was happy.

Then there was another bed, only it wasn’t, because it was hard and there was no mum any more. There was outside only then, where the cold and wet could get you and there was no place to escape it. Giants had come and taken away some of his brothers and sisters, he thought they would come for him too. Instead, some giants destroyed the bed and he went with his remaining brothers to find his mum. They had found places of food and some shelter, but somehow he had got lost.

It hurt to think about those things. He got up and walked on some more. There were lights not far down and he went towards a door. He looked in and saw giants sitting and eating. The air smelt good here, but he couldn’t go in there. A giant had caught him in a food place once and had kicked him. He had limbed away and avoided those places ever since.

He didn’t understand why the giants were so angry. What had he done to make them like that? He was just lost and looking for his mum. Why didn’t they understand that? He couldn’t stay by that door for very long. So he went on again.

The stuff was coming down even more now and he hated it. He was hungry, cold, wet and upset. He meowed and hoped for a reply. When nothing came he looked for a place to get warm and dry. There was a metal door coming down across the area the metal boxes used. Finding some speed, he darted over and squeezed inside. The giant didn’t see him. The space was small and ended in another door. but it was dry and warm enough for him. He curled up and went to sleep.

He dreamed of inside; a soft bed with warm, wiggling bodies next to him, his mum’s tongue washing him and he felt so good and full of milk. He purred in his sleep and become lost in those memories.

The sound of the metal door squeaking made him shot upwards. Sleep was still blurring around him, but had had sensed the danger. He prepared to jump out and run away, but a giant ducked under the moving door and saw him. The giant shouted. He tried to run past, but hands grabbed him. He cried out, and wildly pawed at the hand. He had yet to grow into his claws. The hand didn’t him go and he was brought up to the giant’s body. He couldn’t see.

He felt himself being taken somewhere. He didn’t understand and couldn’t because of the blinding panic shooting through him. He had to get away, far away. Who knew what the giants could do to him. He was put down and the light stung his eyes. He curled into a shaking ball. All around him was noise; the sound of the giants’ voices, the screaming of some wild bird and scuttling of claws. There were smells too that he’d didn’t know.

He looked up and around. He’d never dare go inside before, but he had seen through windows. This place had things stacked about and hanging down. There were other creatures too, watching from behind bars or windows. There was a bird in a large cage almost beside him. That screaming was coming from him. There were fluffy, long eared things and small hairy things and swimming, bright things.

The giants were saying something. Then one let the bird out and it flew around. Shocked, he forgot he should chase after it. Something tapped his back leg, he looked down and saw a bowl. There was food inside. He ate hungrily. Then more food came and he ate that too and then milk! He lapped that up and stared purring. He couldn’t remember a time he had felt fuller.

He was picked up and put in a bed. A bed just for him! It was small and soft and was enclosed. He felt heat along his back and curled up to sleep. He forgot what was around him. He forgot the giants and the screaming bird. He felt safe.

He woke later and yawed loudly. With sleepy eyes he looked outside. He saw half a giant and some boxes. He uncurled and stepped out. His paws tapped on the floor and the giant didn’t stop him. He sniffed around and picked up many new smells. Some even seemed tasty. He visited the creatures and watched them. Only some ran away and hide, the other stared back at him as if they too were trying to figure out what this strange being was in front of them.

A loud, high pitch sound hit his ears. Crying out, he ran back to the bed and buried himself inside it. The sound was stopped and he heard the giants’ voice. Slowly he looked out and saw the giant staring down at him. He was scooped up and placed high up. The giant started feeling him. Cool hands ran across his fur, feeling his bones. Eyes started into his own, his ears were tugged, his mouth was opened, his tail pulled up. He didn’t like this! He pawed at the hand and chased the fingers away. The giant let him go and then put something that had been attached to its head down.

Then he was rubbed and ticked under his chin. That he did like. He arched his back up and flicked his tail for more. It felt so good that he begin to purr. Maybe giants weren’t so bad? When the rubbing stopped, he meowed for more. A new sound came from the giant…a happy loud noise. He was put on the floor, were he rubbed his head against the giant’s leg. The foot twitched and worried he was going to get kicked again, he scrambled away.

He burrowed into his bed once more. But peering out, he only saw the giant watching him closely. A tinkling sound rang out and the giant turned away. There was a blazed of cold air and another entered. He watched them talking and stayed in the bed. When the other had left, he got out and wondered around again. The bird fluttered down and stared at him with massive eyes. He got scared, but didn’t shrink away. The bird made soft clicking noises and then flew away again. He watched it land on top of the bars.

He wanted more food. He scratched at the leg and the giant picked him. They went into another space and there he got food again. He was left alone then and had time to look around this new place. It was shinny and had water dripping. He had a drink from that. The tinkling rang out again and soon the giant appeared. He was picked up and placed in front of another. He was a little scared, but this giant seemed okay. Soft, warm hands stroked him whilst they talk. He purred and rub his head against the fingers. Then he was placed inside his bed and handed over.

Outside he was taken and he meowed loudly. He didn’t want to go outside again! What had he done? Why were they doing this? But instead he was placed in a metal box. Then the Giant got in and there was a roaring sound. He was thrown to the side and then back again. He curled into a ball, but his whole body was vibrating. He didn’t like this!

It soon stopped and the noise ended. The giant took him out. He felt cold wind and wet on his fur. He meowed again. Was he going outside now? He was too afraid to look out. He was shook about and then there was bang that made him jump. Warm, dry air hit him. He looked up and saw that he was inside. He was taken into a room and left on the floor. Then the giant came back and picked him up. He was taken to another room, much like the one he had eaten in before. He was place on top of some dry, smelling stuff…was this his new bed? It wasn’t soft!

He was left there for a long time and he dared not move. Then giant came and stood over him a number of times. He didn’t know what he was meant to do! He was then picked up again and placed beside a bowl of food. Though he still felt full from before, he started eating and the giant left him alone.

He wondered around and saw that this place was like the one he had been born into. It had soft things for the giants to sit on and a flashing box in the corner. There were things on the walls and a bumpy thing going way above him. He went back to his bed for a nap afterwards.

A squealing sound woke him up. He opened his eyes and saw the giant kneeling beside his bed. In her arms was a young giant, but her face was all squashed together and her eyes rolling about. He grew afraid, he didn’t like the look of this. The giant made the young sit down and then he was lifting from the bed. Held gently in one hand, he watched the giant guiding the young’s to stroke him.

At the feel of his fur, the young giggled and squealed again. The giant spoke softly and the hands came again. Then he was given over, placed in the young’s lap. He was scared of that face! He wanted to run but couldn’t. Hands touched him, gently, stroking him. They felt good. Maybe….maybe…the young meant him no harm….something was wrong with it though…but it seemed to understand and it didn’t want to hurt him.

He nuzzled the hand, asking for a chin rub. The young squirmed at the coldness of his nose and then laughed. She spoke and was replied too. He watched and then touched warm skin again. This time he got tickled under the chin. He started purring and knew that this was going to be his inside now.

Bauble

I don’t know what it is, nor why the humans seemed so fascinated by it, maybe it’s because it smells so awesome? Humans aren’t really known for their sense of smell though, not unless you did something stinky in the corner or brought something already decayed inside. Those things just can’t be helped though and don’t humans have an indoors room where they go about their business anyway?

Perhaps, if my kitten-hood had been different I would have known about this event called ‘Christmas.’ I was born wild and rescued- reluctantly, I might add- from the abandoned farm shed, my mother had decided to call home. My memories of that place are dim, but I remember the animal shelter well enough. Thankfully, I got rescued –very willingly, of course-from that place and now I have a good home with two big and one little humans.

When they first brought the tree in, I hide and shyly watched them from behind the table leg. They put the tree in a bucket placed in the corner of the big chairs room and seemed very excited about it. Next, there came the boxes filled with wonderful objects. I was eager to investigate, but stayed away because of all the noise. I’ve only just gotten use to the kitchen machines. It’s the rolling, sucky monster that scares me the most though. Why must humans have everything so clean all the time?

They put the objects on to the tree, chatting loudly, though the only words I understood were; tree and lights. The human vocabulary is still beyond me. After a very long time, in which I took a nap and ate the rest of my breakfast, they were finished and had come away. Ignoring me, they went about their day and I stalked the tree. Some objects were low enough for me to smell and touch. Light bounced off shinning balls and other things I don’t know the names of.

I pressed my nose to one of the balls, it moved gently. I touched it with my paw and it moved more. Ah! A game! Just like the humans tease me with toys. Batting the ball about, I spun to the floor, laying on my back and play biting the ball as I pressed all my paws to it. Rolling to the side, the ball came with me and I jumped in surprise. The ball trundled away and stopped. I stared, then took up my pounce stand and went after it. Grabbing the rope at the top, I threw it and the ball landed in the tree branches.

Glancing about, to make sure the area was still clear, I dived after it and straight into the tree. The leaves stung me, though not painfully and I forced my way through and climbed to the top. Balancing there, I could see the whole room and actually, if I moved down a few branches, I could nestle inside the tree and still perfectly see. Maybe, the humans brought this in here for me? Though it’s not as comfy as my bed basket and the ‘toys’ are not as good as my mice or feather stick, but still, I could get use to this.