The Last Rail

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Perhaps, granddad had gone crazy in his old age. The Alzheimer’s hadn’t helped and he’d really lost it at the end. What he’d left me in his will had caused a chuckle but it had only given me a headache.

Hiking out to the middle of nowhere woods with dad, a marked up map and land deeds, hadn’t been my idea of fun. But here we where! I stepped down onto an old railway track. The metal rails all rusted and the rotten wood warped.

‘Well,’ my dad said, ‘he always had a passion for this place.’

‘What was he going to do with it?’ I asked.

‘Who knows?’

‘What am I going to do with it now?’ I snapped back.

‘Maybe, you could build a house?’ my dad said over his shoulder at me.

I grumbled, ‘perhaps, thirty. Have my own real life mini train village. Shame he left me no money.’

I kicked a few stones and thought, Granddad’s passion for trains had really had the last laugh.

Ticket

Checking my watch I saw that my time was running out. Throwing some money at the taxi driver, I got out and dragged my suitcase behind me. Taking a few steps to the doors then through, I barreled people out of my way and hurried for the escalators. They felt too slow for me though, so I decided to haul my suitcase up and walk to the top. Pushing my through an arguing young couple, I bolted as fast as a man could go with a large suitcase in tow and a heavy rucksack on his back. Surprisingly, that can be quite fast, though I wouldn’t win any awards for it. There was a queue at the ticket machines which stopped me. Breathing deeply whilst the blind panic filled me, I urged the line to move along. I could see the problem right a way as it seemed that people who’d never used the machines before had decided to come out in force today. Checking my watch again, I growled then tried to look calm as another business man glared at me. A card pay only machine came free to my far left; I dashed out of the line and hit the ticket button as I put my case down. I heard a voice shouting behind me, but I ignored it as they could have been saying anything. The machine needed some urging on before it took my card and spit the tickets alongside it out. Grabbing them and my case, I turned to shoot a look at the noticeboard before hurrying to the platform. The train was sat there still as I half ran half slide over, with my heart pounding, my knee throbbing and my mind screaming that I couldn’t miss it or my life would be over. I all but throw myself through a shutting door and nearly tripped. Righting myself, I heard a whistle sound and the wheels lurched under me. Breathing was difficult and sweat clung to me. The train pulled out of the station and picked up speed, whilst I tried to make myself presentable once more. I had made it though and soon I’d be back home for the holidays.